How to Draw a Realistic Mobile Phone with Photoshop

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How to Draw a Realistic Mobile Phone with Photoshop

Post by diamonds on Tue May 22, 2012 12:36 am

Preview


First, let’s take a look at the cell phone we’re going to create in
this tutorial. This cell phone is modeled after one of Nokia’s
products.



Step 1: Determining the Light Source


The most important factor in creating a realistic product digitally
is consistency with the light sources. Therefore, before you draw
anything, you must determine where light is coming from because it will
affect the detailing, coloring, and shading of your work.

In this tutorial, we will pick the top right corner of the canvas for
our light source. The first consequence of this is that the shadows
will be at the bottom left of object. The second result of having the
light source at the right side is that the object will be darker on the
left side.



Step 2: Drawing the Base Shape


Let us begin drawing. First, in Photoshop, create a new document (Ctrl/Cmd + N) with Width at 500px and Height at 1000px.

Start by drawing the main base shape of the cell phone. Usually, it’s
easier to begin by drawing a predefined basic shape such as rectangle,
ellipse, or star, then edit it manually using the Pen Tool (P). In this
case, the basic shape is a rounded rectangle. Draw a rounded rectangle
with the Rounded Rectangle Tool (U) with Radius set at 10px and Color
set to a gray color (#acacac).



With the Pen Tool (P), make 4 additional anchor points by clicking on the shape’s path at the middle of each side.



Select the corner anchor points at the top and pull them down to create a hump at the top middle of the shape.



Press Ctrl/Cmd + T to activate the Free Transform command for the selected points. Hold down Alt and move them inward.



Repeat the same process for the bottom portion of the base shape.



Note: We will be using this technique quite frequently in this tutorial, so it’s best to get the hang of it now.

Step 3: Adding Layer Styles for a 3D Effect


After creating the base shape, we need to add some layer styles to
its layer to give it a realistic look. We will add an Inner Shadow, an
Inner Glow, and a Gradient Overlay. These layer styles will add a 3D
effect onto the shape. To apply layer styles, double-click on the layer
in the Layers Panel, which should open the Layer Styles dialog window.

Inner Shadow




Inner Glow




Gradient Overlay




Step 4: Draw the Inner Area of the Cell Phone


Use Rounded Rectangle Tool (U) combined with the Free Transform
command to draw the inner shape. Use the same technique that we used for
drawing the base shape. Make sure to remove the fill of this shape by
right-clicking inside of its path on your canvas, choosing Blending
Options from the contextual menu, then under Advanced Blending, lowering
the Fill Opacity to 0%.



We will make it look as if the inner area is pressed down into the
base shape. We can do this by giving its layer a Bevel and Emboss layer
style and a Gradient Overlay layer style.

Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 5: Duplicate the Inner Shape


Duplicate the shape we have just created by selecting it in the
Layers Panel and then pressing Ctrl/Cmd + J. Scale it down to 95% of its
original size using Edit > Transform Path > Scale. You can also
do this freehand using Free Transform (Ctrl/Cmd + T), it’s up to you how
accurate you want to be.



Give our duplicated inner shape an Outer Glow and a Gradient Overlay
(you know the drill by now). Make sure to adjust the layer styles’
options to match the direction of our light source.

Outer Glow




Gradient Overlay




Step 6: Create the Right Button


Duplicate the shape layer (Ctrl/Cmd + J) we just made. Use the Pen
Tool (P), but switch the mode to Paths and utilize the Intersect path
areas option in the Options Bar (this saves us from having to be very
accurate on the edge of the inner shape).

With the Pen Tool, draw a path that represents the right button on the most recently duplicated layer.



Next, apply an Outer Glow, a Bevel and Emboss, and a Gradient Overlay.

Outer Glow




Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 7: Duplicate the Button


Duplicate the button shape. Use Free Transform on it by hitting
Ctrl/Cmd + T. Inside the transform control box, right-click and then
choose Scale from the menu. Change the size of the duplicated button to
95%.




http://designinstruct.com/drawing-illustration/how-to-draw-a-realistic-mobile-phone-with-photoshop/


diamonds

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Re: How to Draw a Realistic Mobile Phone with Photoshop

Post by diamonds on Tue May 22, 2012 12:37 am

On the duplicated button that we scaled down, add an Outer Glow layer style and a Bevel and Emboss layer style.

Outer Glow




Bevel and Emboss




Step 8: Create the Second Inner Shape


Remember the first inner layer we created? Duplicate that layer. With
the Pen Tool (P), draw a path that arcs, and make sure that the
Intersect path areas option for the Pen Tool is selected.



Give the second inner area an Outer Glow layer style and a Bevel and Emboss layer style.

Outer Glow




Bevel and Emboss




Step 9: Duplicate the Second Inner Shape


Again, duplicate the previous shape and scale its size down to 99%.
Set its fill color to black (#000000) and lower its Fill Opacity to 40%
so that it appears darker than its background but also lets the gradient
overlay of the shape below it show through.



Give the duplicated shape a Bevel and Emboss and an Outer Glow.

Bevel and Emboss




Outer Glow




Step 10: Create the Background of the Center Buttons


Next up, we will need to create an area at the bottom of the second
inner shape for the main mobile phone buttons. First, duplicate the
shape from the previous step. Use the Rectangle Tool (U) to make
rectangular path at the bottom (remember to select the Intersect path
areas option).

Set the color of this path to black and make sure that it has 100% Opacity and 100% Fill.



Give this shape a Bevel and Emboss layer style.



Step 11: Create the Cell Phone’s Screen


Use Rectangle Tool to draw the screen’s shape. It shouldn’t have a fill color.



Give it three layer styles: Bevel and Emboss, Inner Shadow, and Color Overlay.

Bevel and Emboss




Inner Shadow




Color Overlay




Step 12: Draw the Main Button


Draw an arced shape with the Pen Tool as shown below.



Give this shape a Bevel and Emboss layer style and a Gradient Overlay layer style.

Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 13: Draw the Left Button


Above the main button, create another button shape.



We will use the same layer styles as with the main button (Bevel and Emboss and Gradient Overlay).

Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 14: Create the Right Button


Just duplicate the left button, hit Ctrl/Cmd + T to enter Free
Transform, right-click inside the transform box and choose Flip
Horizontal from the menu that appears. Afterwards, use the Move Tool (T)
to move it to the right side.



Step 15: Draw the Joystick Navigation Background


Draw a circle shape in the middle of the main button using the Ellipse Tool (U). Hold down Shift to make a perfect circle.



Give the joystick’s background a Bevel and Emboss layer style.



Step 16: Draw the Joystick Control


Draw another circle shape (or just duplicate the joystick background and scale it down and change its Color).



Give the joystick control a Bevel and Emboss and a Gradient Overlay.

Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 17: Draw the Button Icons


Just draw a simple polygonal shape on each button using the Pen Tool (P). Feel free to replace them with a shape of your own.



Step 18: Draw a Bottom Corner Highlight


The cell phone shape is very flat at the moment; we will fix that
by adding some highlights and shadows. Draw a path for the highlight on
bottom right corner. Convert this path into a selection by
right-clicking inside the path and choosing Make Selection (or just
press Ctrl/Cmd + Enter).

Create new layer and fill (Edit > Fill or Shift + F5) your selection with white (#ffffff) on this new layer.

Deselect your selection (Ctrl/Cmd + D) and then apply a Gaussian
blur filter (Filter > Blur > Gaussian blur) with a Radius of 5px.



Step 19: Create the Left Bottom Corner Highlight


Just duplicate the highlight layer we just drew and flip it
horizontally (Edit > Transform > Flip Horizontal). Place the
flipped highlight on the opposite side using the Move Tool (V).

We must remember that our light source is from the top right, so the
highlight on left side should not be as strong as the right side. To
lower its brightness, simply reduce the layer’s Opacity to 70%.



Step 20: Create a Dark Spot on the Left Corner


Create a new layer for the dark spots on the bottom corners. Use the
Brush Tool (B) to paint a dark spot on bottom left corner and reduce the
layer’s Opacity to around 20%.



Below, you can see the difference before and after the highlights and
shadow. These small and subtle details add big differences to the
realism of our work.



Step 21: Draw the Speaker


Draw a sort of half-moon shape for the speaker using two ellipses and
the Ellipse Tool (U). See the image below to guide you. Set the Opacity
to 100% and Fill to 0% and choose the Subtract from from path area
option.



Give the speaker shape a Bevel and Emboss, an Inner Shadow, and a Gradient Overlay.

Bevel and Emboss




Inner Shadow




Gradient Overlay




Step 22: Create a Photoshop Pattern for the Speaker’s Fill


Let’s create a pattern for the inner part of the speaker. To start, create a new Photoshop document with size of 32×40px.



Use the Zoom Tool (Z) to zoom in really close to the canvas. Draw a black circle at the top right corner.



Duplicate the circle and place it on the lower left corner.



Save the pattern by selecting around the canvas (Ctrl/Cmd + A) and
going to Edit > Define Pattern. I named our pattern "2 dots", but
feel free to name it anything you want.



Step 23: Apply the "2 dots" Pattern


Return to speaker layer. Double-click the layer to access the Layer
Styles dialog window. Add a Pattern Overlay layer style, choosing the "2
dots" pattern we created from the Pattern dropdown menu.



Step 24: Add the Cell Phone’s Name


We won’t get fancy with our mobioe phone’s name. Just use the
Horizontal Type Tool (T) to write a simple text block for the cell
phone’s brand (in my case, I just called it "CELLPHONE").



Step 25: Drawing the "Connectivity" Icon


Remember the button we drew on the left side of the phone? We’ll
revisit it and give it an icon. Start by creating a small rounded
rectangle with the Rounded Rectangle Tool (U).

Duplicate the path and move it a few pixels down and right. Transform
the duplicated path’s size to around 95% of the original and select the
Subtract from path area option.

Then create a rectangular shape on the left side, also selecting the Subtract from path area option.



Add an Inner Shadow layer style to give the "connectivity" icon a debossed effect.



Duplicate the shape, flip it horizontally (Edit > Transform >
Flip Horizontal), and then flip it vertically (Edit > Transform >
Flip Vertical).



Move this button on top of the left side button. Use Free Transform to angle it appropriately.



Step 26: Draw the Power Button


Draw a rounded rectangle with the Rounded Rectangle Tool that goes
across the top of the mobile phone. Add a new anchor point at the top
middle of the rounded rectangle’s path (using the Pen Tool) and pull it
up to create an arc at its middle.

Draw a triangular path and select the Subtract from path area option to make an indentation at the top of the cell phone.



Apply an Inner Shadow layer style and a Bevel and Emboss layer style to give it a 3D effect.

Inner Shadow




Bevel and Emboss




Step 27: Draw the Base of the Keypad


Our phone is a sliding mobile phone. When you slide it down, the
keypad is revealed. Let’s draw this keypad starting with the base shape.

Use the Rounded Rectangle Tool to draw a rounded rectangle at the
base of our cell phone. Use the Pen Tool to modify the rounded
rectangle’s anchor points to get the shape depicted in the image below.



Give the shape an Inner Shadow and a Bevel and Emboss to give it a 3D effect.

Inner Shadow




Bevel and Emboss




Step 28: Duplicate the Keypad Base Shape


Next, we need to create the inner area of the keypad. Start by
duplicating the base shape and then transforming the copy to a smaller
size (about 80% of the original size). Also, change its color to
#080808.



Add an Inner Shadow layer style and a Stroke layer style.

Inner Shadow




Stroke




Step 29: Create the Second Inner Shape of the Keypad


Duplicate the previous shape, then resize it down. Change its color to #323131.



Give the second inner shape a Stroke and an Inner Shadow.

Stroke




Inner Shadow




Step 30: Draw an Indentation at the Bottom of the Keypad


Duplicate the second inner shape. Draw a rounded rectangle path at the center bottom and select the Intersect path areas option.



Give this shape an Inner Shadow to create the effect of an indentation.


diamonds

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Re: How to Draw a Realistic Mobile Phone with Photoshop

Post by diamonds on Tue May 22, 2012 12:39 am

The Best of Design Instruct eBooks are here! Visit the Products Page to learn more.





How to Draw a Realistic Mobile Phone with Photoshop










Jul 19 2010
21 Comments
By Mohammad Jeprie


In this Photoshop tutorial, we will draw a realistic mobile device.
Our aim is to make our work appear so realistic that it looks just like a
regular product shot. We will cover basic concepts for drawing a
true to life object, making a basic pattern for the speakers of our
mobile device, leveraging plenty of layer styles to keep our techniques
flexible and non-destructive, and more. The key technique we will stress
upon is paying attention to the small details, which greatly affects
realism.





Author: Mohammad Jeprie





Mohammad Jeprie is an author, blogger, and graphic designer from
Indonesia. He knows his way around Photoshop and loves sharing his
knowledge with others. He runs DesainDigital
where he regularly shares tutorials, design information, and visual
inspiration. Join him on Twitter and send him a tweet -- his handle is @desaindigital.






Preview


First, let’s take a look at the cell phone we’re going to create in
this tutorial. This cell phone is modeled after one of Nokia’s
products.



Step 1: Determining the Light Source


The most important factor in creating a realistic product digitally
is consistency with the light sources. Therefore, before you draw
anything, you must determine where light is coming from because it will
affect the detailing, coloring, and shading of your work.

In this tutorial, we will pick the top right corner of the canvas for
our light source. The first consequence of this is that the shadows
will be at the bottom left of object. The second result of having the
light source at the right side is that the object will be darker on the
left side.



Step 2: Drawing the Base Shape


Let us begin drawing. First, in Photoshop, create a new document (Ctrl/Cmd + N) with Width at 500px and Height at 1000px.

Start by drawing the main base shape of the cell phone. Usually, it’s
easier to begin by drawing a predefined basic shape such as rectangle,
ellipse, or star, then edit it manually using the Pen Tool (P). In this
case, the basic shape is a rounded rectangle. Draw a rounded rectangle
with the Rounded Rectangle Tool (U) with Radius set at 10px and Color
set to a gray color (#acacac).



With the Pen Tool (P), make 4 additional anchor points by clicking on the shape’s path at the middle of each side.



Select the corner anchor points at the top and pull them down to create a hump at the top middle of the shape.



Press Ctrl/Cmd + T to activate the Free Transform command for the selected points. Hold down Alt and move them inward.



Repeat the same process for the bottom portion of the base shape.



Note: We will be using this technique quite frequently in this tutorial, so it’s best to get the hang of it now.

Step 3: Adding Layer Styles for a 3D Effect


After creating the base shape, we need to add some layer styles to
its layer to give it a realistic look. We will add an Inner Shadow, an
Inner Glow, and a Gradient Overlay. These layer styles will add a 3D
effect onto the shape. To apply layer styles, double-click on the layer
in the Layers Panel, which should open the Layer Styles dialog window.

Inner Shadow




Inner Glow




Gradient Overlay




Step 4: Draw the Inner Area of the Cell Phone


Use Rounded Rectangle Tool (U) combined with the Free Transform
command to draw the inner shape. Use the same technique that we used for
drawing the base shape. Make sure to remove the fill of this shape by
right-clicking inside of its path on your canvas, choosing Blending
Options from the contextual menu, then under Advanced Blending, lowering
the Fill Opacity to 0%.



We will make it look as if the inner area is pressed down into the
base shape. We can do this by giving its layer a Bevel and Emboss layer
style and a Gradient Overlay layer style.

Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 5: Duplicate the Inner Shape


Duplicate the shape we have just created by selecting it in the
Layers Panel and then pressing Ctrl/Cmd + J. Scale it down to 95% of its
original size using Edit > Transform Path > Scale. You can also
do this freehand using Free Transform (Ctrl/Cmd + T), it’s up to you how
accurate you want to be.



Give our duplicated inner shape an Outer Glow and a Gradient Overlay
(you know the drill by now). Make sure to adjust the layer styles’
options to match the direction of our light source.

Outer Glow




Gradient Overlay




Step 6: Create the Right Button


Duplicate the shape layer (Ctrl/Cmd + J) we just made. Use the Pen
Tool (P), but switch the mode to Paths and utilize the Intersect path
areas option in the Options Bar (this saves us from having to be very
accurate on the edge of the inner shape).

With the Pen Tool, draw a path that represents the right button on the most recently duplicated layer.



Next, apply an Outer Glow, a Bevel and Emboss, and a Gradient Overlay.

Outer Glow




Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 7: Duplicate the Button


Duplicate the button shape. Use Free Transform on it by hitting
Ctrl/Cmd + T. Inside the transform control box, right-click and then
choose Scale from the menu. Change the size of the duplicated button to
95%.



On the duplicated button that we scaled down, add an Outer Glow layer style and a Bevel and Emboss layer style.

Outer Glow




Bevel and Emboss




Step 8: Create the Second Inner Shape


Remember the first inner layer we created? Duplicate that layer. With
the Pen Tool (P), draw a path that arcs, and make sure that the
Intersect path areas option for the Pen Tool is selected.



Give the second inner area an Outer Glow layer style and a Bevel and Emboss layer style.

Outer Glow




Bevel and Emboss




Step 9: Duplicate the Second Inner Shape


Again, duplicate the previous shape and scale its size down to 99%.
Set its fill color to black (#000000) and lower its Fill Opacity to 40%
so that it appears darker than its background but also lets the gradient
overlay of the shape below it show through.



Give the duplicated shape a Bevel and Emboss and an Outer Glow.

Bevel and Emboss




Outer Glow




Step 10: Create the Background of the Center Buttons


Next up, we will need to create an area at the bottom of the second
inner shape for the main mobile phone buttons. First, duplicate the
shape from the previous step. Use the Rectangle Tool (U) to make
rectangular path at the bottom (remember to select the Intersect path
areas option).

Set the color of this path to black and make sure that it has 100% Opacity and 100% Fill.



Give this shape a Bevel and Emboss layer style.



Step 11: Create the Cell Phone’s Screen


Use Rectangle Tool to draw the screen’s shape. It shouldn’t have a fill color.



Give it three layer styles: Bevel and Emboss, Inner Shadow, and Color Overlay.

Bevel and Emboss




Inner Shadow




Color Overlay




Step 12: Draw the Main Button


Draw an arced shape with the Pen Tool as shown below.



Give this shape a Bevel and Emboss layer style and a Gradient Overlay layer style.

Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 13: Draw the Left Button


Above the main button, create another button shape.



We will use the same layer styles as with the main button (Bevel and Emboss and Gradient Overlay).

Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 14: Create the Right Button


Just duplicate the left button, hit Ctrl/Cmd + T to enter Free
Transform, right-click inside the transform box and choose Flip
Horizontal from the menu that appears. Afterwards, use the Move Tool (T)
to move it to the right side.



Step 15: Draw the Joystick Navigation Background


Draw a circle shape in the middle of the main button using the Ellipse Tool (U). Hold down Shift to make a perfect circle.



Give the joystick’s background a Bevel and Emboss layer style.



Step 16: Draw the Joystick Control


Draw another circle shape (or just duplicate the joystick background and scale it down and change its Color).



Give the joystick control a Bevel and Emboss and a Gradient Overlay.

Bevel and Emboss




Gradient Overlay




Step 17: Draw the Button Icons


Just draw a simple polygonal shape on each button using the Pen Tool (P). Feel free to replace them with a shape of your own.



Step 18: Draw a Bottom Corner Highlight


The cell phone shape is very flat at the moment; we will fix that
by adding some highlights and shadows. Draw a path for the highlight on
bottom right corner. Convert this path into a selection by
right-clicking inside the path and choosing Make Selection (or just
press Ctrl/Cmd + Enter).

Create new layer and fill (Edit > Fill or Shift + F5) your selection with white (#ffffff) on this new layer.

Deselect your selection (Ctrl/Cmd + D) and then apply a Gaussian
blur filter (Filter > Blur > Gaussian blur) with a Radius of 5px.



Step 19: Create the Left Bottom Corner Highlight


Just duplicate the highlight layer we just drew and flip it
horizontally (Edit > Transform > Flip Horizontal). Place the
flipped highlight on the opposite side using the Move Tool (V).

We must remember that our light source is from the top right, so the
highlight on left side should not be as strong as the right side. To
lower its brightness, simply reduce the layer’s Opacity to 70%.



Step 20: Create a Dark Spot on the Left Corner


Create a new layer for the dark spots on the bottom corners. Use the
Brush Tool (B) to paint a dark spot on bottom left corner and reduce the
layer’s Opacity to around 20%.



Below, you can see the difference before and after the highlights and
shadow. These small and subtle details add big differences to the
realism of our work.



Step 21: Draw the Speaker


Draw a sort of half-moon shape for the speaker using two ellipses and
the Ellipse Tool (U). See the image below to guide you. Set the Opacity
to 100% and Fill to 0% and choose the Subtract from from path area
option.



Give the speaker shape a Bevel and Emboss, an Inner Shadow, and a Gradient Overlay.

Bevel and Emboss




Inner Shadow




Gradient Overlay




Step 22: Create a Photoshop Pattern for the Speaker’s Fill


Let’s create a pattern for the inner part of the speaker. To start, create a new Photoshop document with size of 32×40px.



Use the Zoom Tool (Z) to zoom in really close to the canvas. Draw a black circle at the top right corner.



Duplicate the circle and place it on the lower left corner.



Save the pattern by selecting around the canvas (Ctrl/Cmd + A) and
going to Edit > Define Pattern. I named our pattern "2 dots", but
feel free to name it anything you want.



Step 23: Apply the "2 dots" Pattern


Return to speaker layer. Double-click the layer to access the Layer
Styles dialog window. Add a Pattern Overlay layer style, choosing the "2
dots" pattern we created from the Pattern dropdown menu.



Step 24: Add the Cell Phone’s Name


We won’t get fancy with our mobioe phone’s name. Just use the
Horizontal Type Tool (T) to write a simple text block for the cell
phone’s brand (in my case, I just called it "CELLPHONE").



Step 25: Drawing the "Connectivity" Icon


Remember the button we drew on the left side of the phone? We’ll
revisit it and give it an icon. Start by creating a small rounded
rectangle with the Rounded Rectangle Tool (U).

Duplicate the path and move it a few pixels down and right. Transform
the duplicated path’s size to around 95% of the original and select the
Subtract from path area option.

Then create a rectangular shape on the left side, also selecting the Subtract from path area option.



Add an Inner Shadow layer style to give the "connectivity" icon a debossed effect.



Duplicate the shape, flip it horizontally (Edit > Transform >
Flip Horizontal), and then flip it vertically (Edit > Transform >
Flip Vertical).



Move this button on top of the left side button. Use Free Transform to angle it appropriately.



Step 26: Draw the Power Button


Draw a rounded rectangle with the Rounded Rectangle Tool that goes
across the top of the mobile phone. Add a new anchor point at the top
middle of the rounded rectangle’s path (using the Pen Tool) and pull it
up to create an arc at its middle.

Draw a triangular path and select the Subtract from path area option to make an indentation at the top of the cell phone.



Apply an Inner Shadow layer style and a Bevel and Emboss layer style to give it a 3D effect.

Inner Shadow




Bevel and Emboss




Step 27: Draw the Base of the Keypad


Our phone is a sliding mobile phone. When you slide it down, the
keypad is revealed. Let’s draw this keypad starting with the base shape.

Use the Rounded Rectangle Tool to draw a rounded rectangle at the
base of our cell phone. Use the Pen Tool to modify the rounded
rectangle’s anchor points to get the shape depicted in the image below.



Give the shape an Inner Shadow and a Bevel and Emboss to give it a 3D effect.

Inner Shadow




Bevel and Emboss




Step 28: Duplicate the Keypad Base Shape


Next, we need to create the inner area of the keypad. Start by
duplicating the base shape and then transforming the copy to a smaller
size (about 80% of the original size). Also, change its color to
#080808.



Add an Inner Shadow layer style and a Stroke layer style.

Inner Shadow




Stroke




Step 29: Create the Second Inner Shape of the Keypad


Duplicate the previous shape, then resize it down. Change its color to #323131.



Give the second inner shape a Stroke and an Inner Shadow.

Stroke




Inner Shadow




Step 30: Draw an Indentation at the Bottom of the Keypad


Duplicate the second inner shape. Draw a rounded rectangle path at the center bottom and select the Intersect path areas option.



Give this shape an Inner Shadow to create the effect of an indentation.



Step 31: Draw the Base of a Key


Now we need to create the keys for our key pad. Start by drawing a
black rounded rectangle and modifying its anchor points with the Pen
Tool until you create an irregular diamond shape.



Give this shape a Bevel and Emboss layer style.



Step 32: Create the Inner Area of the Button


Duplicate shape we just created and resize it down to 95% of the original size. Change its color to #606060.



Add a Bevel and Emboss layer style onto it to give it a 3D effect.



Use the Horizontal Type Tool (T) to type some letters onto the key.



Step 33: Duplicate the Key


Duplicate shape we created, press Ctrl/Cmd + T to activate Free
Transform, right-click inside the transform box, and choose Flip
Horizontal. Move this to the other side of the keypad and also add a
different letter using the Horizontal Type Tool (T).



Step 34: Draw More Keys


At this point, you already know how to draw a key on our keypad, so
I’ll let you use your creativity to finish it up. Use the techniques
we’ve already discussed.



Step 35: Give the Mobile Phone a Texture


In real life, nothing’s perfect — there’s always some sort of defect
on every product; whether it’s through normal wear-and-tear or a
manufacturer’s shortcomings, cell phones will always have imperfect
surfaces.

To make our work as realistic as possible, we need to add these flaws to our design.

Hold down Ctrl/Cmd and click every layer’s thumbnail in the Layers Panel until the cell phone has a selection around it.

Create a new layer above all the other layers and fill it (Shift + F5) with black (#000000).

Choose Filter > Noise > Add Noise.

After applying the filter, switch the Blend Mode to Screen and reduce the layer’s Opacity to 80%.



Step 36: Reduce the Noise on the Mobile Phone’s Screen


We don’t need the noise texture to be too — shall we say, "noisy" —
on our mobile phone’s screen. To do this, make sure to select the noise
layer and then click on the Add layer mask icon at the bottom of the
Layers Panel. Use the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) to create a selection
of the mobile phone’s screen. Go to Edit > Fill and in the Use
option, pick 50% Gray.



In image below, we can view the difference before and after we remove
some of the noise. The difference is subtle, yet important.



Step 37: Create a Drop Shadow


Create a new layer and place it behind all the other layers in the
layer stacking order. Select the cell phone again using the method we
discussed previously.

Fill the selection on the new layer with black.

Use the Move Tool (V) to shift the filled selection down and left (because our light source is from the top right corner).

Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur with Radius at around 9px. Then, reduce the layer’s Opacity to 40%.



Step 38: Finish up the Drop Shadow


This is the final step we need to accomplish. The shadow will cast a
softer drop shadow on the floor. To do this, we just need to duplicate
the previous shadow we created and apply another Gaussian Blur filter on
it using a bigger Radius value.



Tutorial Summary


In this tutorial, we created a realistic cell phone completely from
scratch using shape tools, the Pen Tool, and plenty of layer styles. I
hope these techniques have imparted a few tips to you that you can
incorporate into your workflow when drawing your own realistic products.



Download Source Files



diamonds

الجنس : Female

عدد المساهمات : 530
النقاط : 22420
التقييم : 7
تاريخ التسجيل : 2011-03-05

View user profile

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Re: How to Draw a Realistic Mobile Phone with Photoshop

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